Social Security Benefits for Disabled Adult Children

The A&M TeamSocial Security

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The Social Security Administration (SSA) manages four separate benefit programs for people with disabilities. Your eligibility for the program that is right for you depends on several factors. Some of the determining factors include onset date of disability, parent’s income/work history and the nature of your disability. Often, people are confused between two benefit programs; the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and the Disabled Adult Child Benefits (DAC). The confusion mainly arises because both of these programs consider the beneficiary a child and requires information about his/her qualifying parent’s Social Security earnings. The SSI is simpler to understand as it is for children under the age of 18 and is awarded to the child if his/her and the parents’ income and resources are below a certain standard (along with other requirements). The DAC on the other hand, is for an adult (above the age of 18) but is entitled to his/her child benefits based off of the parent’s Social Security earnings record.

Who qualifies as a Disabled Adult Child?

To be considered a disabled adult child by the SSA the applicant should meet the following criteria:

  • To be considered an adult child you should be over the age of 18
  • You should be unmarried
  • The onset of the disability in question should have been before the age of 22
  • One of your parents receives Social Security benefits or if they are deceased they should have worked enough to qualify for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI).

If a child were receiving benefits through the SSI before the age of 18, they would receive benefits under the DAC after the age of 18. Furthermore, if you qualify as a disabled adult child you will receive payments monthly through the Social Security Disability Insurance program.

How does the SSA determine if an adult child applicant is eligible for benefits?

The SSA determines eligibility of an adult child just like they would process a claim for a disabled adult. The application is sent to Disability Determination Services that checks

  • If your disability has lasted 12 months or is expected to last 12 months,
  • Is your disability listed in the list of eligible impairments for benefits,
  • If your disability hampers your ability to perform substantial work to support yourself.

To prove that an adult child meets the disability eligibility, a good amount of evidence is required. Evidence can include anything from lab tests to the physician’s/specialist’s observations.

A lot of paperwork goes into filing for Disabled Adult Child benefits. The application is crucial to the success of your case. There is a long checklist of documents you need and the SSA might request additional ones, depending on your case. Attorneys who are experts in the Social Security Disability application process in your state can make a huge difference in your struggle to get the benefits you or your loved one deserves. If you are looking to apply for benefits in Oklahoma, you should reach out to the passionate Social Security Disability attorneys at Atkins and Markoff who go the extra mile to make sure their client’s impairment does not stop them from getting the maximum assistance possible. We offer a free consultation service that allows us to meet with you and go over your case in detail before getting started. Contact Atkins and Markoff today to increase the chances of your disability benefits application being accepted.