Is Your Company Prepared for Wildfire Possibilities?

The A&M TeamWorkers’ Compensation

Do you work outside, or work with flammable materials? Depending on your workplace and the responsibilities that you hold, you could be in dry brush working with open flames or tools that may cause sparks. Also, if you work as an electrician then you may be working with power lines that could spark and cause flames to fall to the ground below.

A recent report on Catoosa Times says that the fire danger is increasing in the state of Oklahoma. The Oklahoma Forestry Services Division of the Department of Agriculture says that the public needs to be aware of this fire danger and do what they can to prevent flames from happening. Grasses, downed tree limbs, and debris from the recent tornadoes in the state all could catch on fire in an instant if given the opportunity. A county burn ban was recently used by Cotton County, where the drought rate is higher than determined and there is not more than one-half inch of precipitation forecasted in the months ahead.

OSHA suggests that all workplaces come up with a preparedness plan in the event of a dangers wildfire. All workplaces should have a detailed plan that includes a chain of command for emergencies, conditions that will activate a plan, specific evacuation procedures, equipment for personnel that will fight fires, and emergency functions to prevent fires. If your workplace doesn’t have a plan in place, then the supervisors are in violation of the law.

You will want to contact an attorney immediately if you want more information about worker’s compensation after being injured in a fire accident at work. Burn injuries may prohibit you from working in the position that you used to fulfill, so you will want to collect worker’s compensation for your suffering if possible. Hire an Oklahoma City worker’s compensation attorney today for more information!